CRUK CI, credit Phil Mynott

Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute

The Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute aims to bring the scientific strengths of Cambridge to bear on practical questions of cancer diagnosis, treatment and prevention. The Institute focuses specifically on the practical application of high-quality basic research.

About us

Latest news

  • News

    Molecular patterns could better predict breast cancer recurrence

    The genetic and molecular make-up of individual breast tumours holds clues to how a woman’s disease could progress, including the likelihood of it coming back after treatment, and in what time frame, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published in Nature. In the first study of its kind, scientists at the Cancer Research UK […]

    Find out more
  • News

    Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

    A pioneering group of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. Research by our Marioni Group, in collaboration with scientists at the Wellcome – MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian […]

    Find out more
  • News

    Dr Sarah Bohndiek awarded SPIE Early Career Achievement Award

    The International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) presented Dr Sarah Bohndiek with a 2019 SPIE Early Career Achievement Award yesterday. Bohndiek was recognized at the SPIE Fellows Luncheon during the Society’s annual Photonics West Symposium in San Francisco. The SPIE Early Career Achievement Awards recognize young professionals’ significant and innovative technical contributions in engineering or […]

    Find out more
  • News

    Investigating mobile DNA in mammalian development

    Dr Rebecca Berrens has been awarded a prestigious Sir Henry Wellcome Fellowship to study the effect of transposable elements in early mammalian development. Transposable elements are DNA sequences that can move around within the genome. First discovered in plants in the 1940’s, transposable elements have been found in almost every organism and are thought to have […]

    Find out more

Who we work with